Vertical Veggie Fan Club

Are you a Vertical Veggie Garden Fanatic?

Then this page is for you!  

Click on the links below to get more information about: 

Fan Club Information

If you love growing veggies and other edibles and you love vertical gardens, then this is the club for you!

Members will receive:

  • Monthly newsletters with information about the crops in season that month;
  • Plant Care Tips & Tricks;
  • Pest and Disease Control Suggestions.

Membership is free. Submit your name and email address in the form below to join.

 
 

Planning & Growing This Season's Veggies

Featured Veggies

The Veggies featured below are recommended for vertical gardening and available for purchase as a   Veggie Garden In A Box this Fall.

Astro Arugula - These gourmet greens thrives in cool weather and is a great choice for vertical gardening. Arugula's oak leaf-shaped leaves grow in a loose bunch and have a peppery taste that is great for adding some zing to your salads, pastas, and even pizzas. The edible flowers make an attractive garnish and add lots of flavor.

Champion Collards - This is a trusty and widely adapted variety. Like the Astro Arugula, Champion Collards can be grown in Hardiness Zones 3a through 10b in the right seasons! This variety has large dark green leaves with a delicious cabbage flavor. 

Winterbor Kale  - This variety of Kale produces excellent yield and has better cold hardiness than other varieties. The leaves are curled, ruffled and blue-green in color. Harvest the lower leaves and this vigorous plant will continue growing to produce leaves for successive harvests.

  • Days to Maturity: 35 – 50 (Spring/Summer) and 35 – 50 (Fall/Winter)
  • Temp Hardy: Very hardy and can withstand frost
  • Climate: Arugula prefers rich, moist soil and cooler temperatures (45 to 75 degrees F is ideal) but can withstand a variety of different climates. Hot weather causes quick bolting, so it's best to plant in fall or early spring in warmer climates.
  • Soil Temps: Arugula germinates well in cool (45˚F) soil and will continue to do so until it gets up to 75˚F. At higher temperatures germination gets erratic.
  • Soil pH: 6.0 – 7.0; ideal 6.5 – 7.0
  • Soil Requirements: Fertile and moisture retentive soil that is well drained is a requirement.
  • Sun:  Will need at least 6 hours of full sun
  • Water: High water requirements; these fast-growing plants must have all of the water they need for rapid growth. It is important that the soil is kept moist at all times. Depending on the container you are growing your plants in, Arugula will need ½ of inch of water at least three times a week. These greens are delicate and do not like to dry out. The soil should be kept constantly moist.
  • Food: Arugula grows quickly and for best growth and flavor they should have all of the nutrients readily available. Their main requirement is nitrogen, but they also need moderate amounts of potassium and phosphorus. Feed with compost tea or liquid kelp at a rate of 5 gallons per 100 square feet, every 3 weeks. You can also mix together a few ounces of blood meal and rock phosphate and sprinkle over the soil to help provide further nutrition each time you water the plants.
  • Containers: Arugula is very well suited for container growing. Choose a container that has a minimum depth of 4". Make sure that your container has at least one drainage hole. Fill with a mixture of potting soil and compost and water thoroughly. Place in full sun. Make sure to keep the soil consistently moist.
  • Diseases : Bacterial Leaf Spot, Bacterial Blight, Damping Off, Downy Mildew
  • Days to Maturity: 65 - 80 (Spring/Summer) and 75 - 90 (Fall/Winter)
  • Growing Habit: Bush
  • Temp Hardy: Very hardy and can withstand temps as low as 0 degrees F.
  • Climate: Collards are such a long season crop. Wait until the cold weather has passed before planting to reduce chances of bolting. Though Collards are most tender and better flavored when grown in cool weather, they do tolerate heat. Ideal temps are 40 to 80 degrees F.
  • Soil Temps: ~ 45 degrees F. Collards are pretty hardy and can go into the ground when it is still fairly cold. However they will germinate and grow faster in warmer soil.
  • Soil pH: 6.0 – 7.5; ideal 6.5 – 7.0
  • Soil Requirements: Collards are tolerant of poor soil but the most palatable leaves are produced by rapid uninterrupted growth. For this the soil must be rich and moisture retentive. It is important that the soil is well drained when growing collards as a winter crop . If the soil is too wet the roots may rot.
  • Spacing: Plant 20 to 30 inches apart
  • Sun:  Will need at least 6 hours of full sun. They will be most productive in full sun, although they will tolerate partial shade.
  • Water: Moderate water requirements; Collards must have plenty of water for maximum productivity and best quality. Water about 1/2 a gallon per plant, 1 to 2 times per week until established. Water 1/4 gallon per plant, 1 to 2 times per week after established. Monitor the soil moisture level closely as many factors can change the amount of water your plants will need.
  • Food: Heavy feeders, Collards require a significant amount of phosphorus and potassium, but not a lot of nitrogen. It will flower early with too much nitrogen. Applying Bone Meal and Granite Dust or Green Sand to the surface of the soil will assure that the plants will receive the nutrients they require every time you water. Feed the plants with compost tea or liquid kelp at a rate of 5 gallons per 100 square feet, starting as soon as they have recovered from transplanting and every month thereafter. This is especially important if you are harvesting regularly.
  • Containers: Collards grow larger than most greens, so you will need a container that is a minimum of 20" wide and as deep as possible. Because vertical gardening planters are more shallow than the usual 12 to 18" deep containers recommended for this plant, the roots will spread out rather than down. This means that the plant may need to be supported when it reaches its full height. You will need to keep a close watch on the moisture level in the soil. Because the root ball will be large it will require more frequent watering. 
  • Days to Maturity: 60 (Spring/Summer) and 60 (Fall/Winter)
  • Temp Hardy: Very hardy. This variety will keep growing and producing right through the winter in milder areas and can be extremely frost tolerant.
  • Climate: This variety grows well in both heat and cold. 0 to 80 degrees F, this plant will do just fine.
  • Soil Temps: ~ 45 degrees F. Kale is pretty hardy and can go into the ground when it is still fairly cold. However they will germinate and grow faster in warmer soil.
  • Soil pH: 6.0 – 7.5; ideal 6.5 – 7.0
  • Soil Requirements: Kale is more tolerant of poor soil than any of the other Brassicas, but the most palatable leaves are produced by rapid uninterrupted growth. For this the soil must be rich and moisture retentive. It is important that the soil is well drained when growing kale as a winter crop. If the soil is too wet the roots may rot. Kale likes a neutral pH, so add lime if necessary.
  • Sun:  Will need at least 6 hours of full sun. They will be most productive in full sun, although they will tolerate partial shade.
  • Water: Moderate water requirements; Kale must have plenty of water for maximum productivity and best quality. Water about 1/2 a gallon per plant, 2 to 3 times per week. Monitor the soil moisture level closely as many factors can change the amount of water your plants will need. Kale has large leaves and can lose a lot of water in warm weather. Keep the plants well supplied with water for maximum production and best quality.
  • Food: Heavy feeders, Kale requires a significant amount of phosphorus and potassium, but not a lot of nitrogen. Applying Bone Meal and Granite Dust or Green Sand to the surface of the soil will assure that the plants will receive the nutrients they require every time you water. Feed the plants with compost tea or liquid kelp at a rate of 5 gallons per 100 square feet, starting as soon as they have recovered from transplanting and every month thereafter. This is especially important if you are harvesting regularly.
  • Containers: You will need a container that is a minimum of 20" wide and as deep as possible. Because vertical gardening planters are more shallow than the usual 12" deep containers recommended for this plant, the roots will spread out rather than down. This means that the plant may need to be supported when it reaches its full height. You will need to keep a close watch on the moisture level in the soil. Because the root ball will be large it will require more frequent watering.